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Einstürzende Neubauten for Dublin show next year

Einstürzende Neubauten for Dublin show next year

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The German experimental band Einstürzende Neubauten are to perform in Dublin for the first time in 17 years at the National Concert Hall next summer.

The show is presented by Foggy Notions in association with U:MACK and takes place at National Concert Hall, on Sunday July 3rd, 2022.

Tickets are €48.50each plus fees on sale Thursday 8th July at 10:00am from the NCH website.


Einstürzende Neubauten bio


More than any other group, Einstürzende Neubauten embody industrial music in its most literal sense. The German band helped pioneer the genre with an avant-garde mix of white-noise guitar drones, abrasive vocals, and a clanging, rhythmic din produced by a percussion section consisting of construction materials, power tools, broken glass, and various metal objects. Taking Luigi Russolo’s Futurist manifesto, The Art of Noises, to its logical extreme, the group began assaulting their audience’s senses in the early ’80s, attacking the stage with jackhammers and occasionally causing property damage. Neubauten’s radical performances and recordings attracted controversy, but their anarchic spirit and sheer innovation inspired countless musicians (particularly Henry Rollins and Ministry’s Al Jourgensen, both of whom infamously sport tattoos of the band’s petroglyph-like logo). Following the group’s more free-form early recordings such as 1981’s Kollaps, Neubauten’s work became more structured on albums like 1986’s Halber Mensch; the rhythms became more danceable, and Blixa Bargeld expanded his vocal style from hoarse shouting to more melodic singing and poetic recitations. The group’s music became softer and more electronic, but no less challenging or visionary, beginning with 1993’s Tabula Rasa. Early adaptors of the now-common practice of crowd-funding, much of the group’s 21st century undertakings, including performances, reissues, and releases like 2007’s Alles Wieder Offen, have been supported by their loyal fan base rather than proper record companies. One exception was 2014’s Lament, a studio reconstruction of a commissioned performance piece themed around World War I. 2020 full-length Alles in Allem continued to reflect on the past, making references to Berlin’s history and the group members’ upbringing, while exploring new possibilities and perspectives.