Longitude has announced its first round of acts to play in Marlay Park from 13 to 15 July this year and it includes some big names in rap, soul and R&B like Solange, Anderson .Paak, J.Cole, Travis Scott, Cardi B, Post Malone, Tyler, The Creator & Migos.

The lineup looks like this:

Friday 13th July:

  • J. Cole
  • Migos
  • Post Malone

Saturday 14th July:

  • Travis Scott
  • Diplo
  • Tyer, The Creator

Sunday 15th July:

  • Solange
  • Anderson .Paak & The Free Nationals
  • Sampha

Plus…

  • Khalid
  • Cardi B
  • Giggs
  • J Hus
  • Joey Bada$$
  • The Internet
  • Lil Pump
  • blackbear
  • 6LACK
  • Ibeyi
  • Jacob Banks
  • Kali Uchis
  • A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie
  • Princess Nokia
  • Mabel
  • Big Shaq
  • Belly
  • Naaz
  • Bas

TICKETS

Weekend tickets €189.50 / Two Day Tickets: €129.50 / Day tickets €69.50
All ticket prices are inclusive of booking fee
Tickets On Sale 9am Friday 16th February from Ticketmaster.

Three customers can get their hands on Longitude tickets before anyone else, presale tickets go on sale at www.three.ie/3plus February 14th at 9am, 48hours before general release.

Posted on February 9th, 2018

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The most essential tracks of the last week handpicked by the Nialler9 team.

1.

David Byrne – Everybody’s Coming To My House

As suggested last week, David Byrne will release his first solo album since 2004 on March 9th and it’s called American Utopia. He has made albums with Eno, St. Vincent and Karl Hyde, it’s his first solo album. It’s produced by The xx cohort Rodaidh McDonald and features guests, Jack Peñate, Oneohtrix Point Never, Jam City and Thomas Bartlett,  and its choreographed live shows to come, Byrne has suggested are “the most ambitious show I’ve done since the shows that were filmed for Stop Making Sense.”

Talk about expectations. ‘Everybody’s Coming To My House’ is Byrne at his best – melding acoustic textures, brass and Afrobeat textures with his trademark pop songwriting.


2.

Wolf Alice – Don’t Delete The Kisses (Charli XCX x Post Precious remix)

A highlight from Wolf Alice last year gets a reworked electro-pop version from pop auteur Charli XCX. The song’s ode to young love and it’s “what if he’s not meant for me?” hook is wisely reinforced with new tones here.


3.

Kendrick Lamar x SZA – All The Stars

Kendrick is curating Marvel’s Black Panther movie soundtrack and ‘All The Stars’ is our first offering from it. So that’s both creators of album number 1 and 2 of 2017’s best albums collaborating (they are on the same label). SZA outshines Kendrick on this – her honey-dripped voice beholden with power is very suitable for a superhero movie. Kendrick can’t compete.


4.

Bruno Mars – Finesse (Remix) (Feat. Cardi B)

Cardi B adds some Salt’n’Pepa ’90s shake to a highlight from Bruno Mars’ 24K Magic. Props also for the 60fps video.


5.

Superorganism – Everybody Wants To Be Famous

London-based eight-member pop crew Superorganism show off their off-kilter electronic pop with their second big single. An album comes out on Domino on March 2nd.


6.

Rosie Carney – K

Donegal singer-songwriter Rosie Carney dropped a fine and faithful cover of a Cigarettes After Sex song written about lust and desire for a new partner on the Lower East Side.


7.

Reykjavíkurdætur – Hvao er Malio

Icelandic ice-queen rap collective Daughters of Reykjavík are always welcome around here, regardless of what they’re rapping about – the driinks menu? Either way, it bumps.


8.

Fischerspoooner – Togetherness feat. Caroline Polachek

The wandering Electro-clash Casey Fischerspooner returns with a fine electronic pop song featuring former Chairlift singer.


9.

Charli XCX – Backseat (Feat. Carly Rae Jepsen)

Charli XCX strikes again. December is a terrible time to release anything but Charli doesn’t give a fuck and dropped Pop 2 mixtape that kicks off with this M83 style banger.


Posted on January 9th, 2018

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Popular Music, like nigh on everything else, has been dominated with political sentiment in 2017. In a year where issues of race, class and gender were (sometimes painfully) brought to the fore of civic discussion, music has dutifully followed suit.

In fact, much of this year’s popular music can be viewed as a reaction to political stimulus, whether it be civic, social or body. Barring the possibility of a new mega-hit emerging in the rest of December, the year’s most popular song is undoubtedly ‘Despacito’, sung by Luis Fonsi and guest featuring Daddy Yankee.

The Grammy-nominated song, considered by many to be a shoe-in for the award, has continually broken commercial records since it’s original release in January of this year. Perhaps the most relevant broken record of all associated with the sultry Latin smash hit is it claiming the mantle of having the most weeks at the number one spot for a primarily Non-English song.

Considering the recent growth in anti-immigrant sentiment across the political landscape the fact that a loud and proud Latin song became the monster tune that it did speaks volumes about where the political allegiances of the youth lie. Even though it remains only token, it is a sweet gesture none the less.

“Lamar, on the other hand, seems intent on highlighting, criticising and interrogating many of the underlying attitudes and behaviours of the society he exists in.

Any discussion of popular music in 2017 must include an examination of African-American rap and hip-hop. While ‘Despacito’ may grab all the record consumer numbers, the most influential album of the year must be accredited to DAMN, Kendrick Lamar’s fourth studio album release. Lamar has always been an artist able to bridge the gap between the conscious and the commercial, yet the release of DAMN has seen his name become synonymous with popular culture while providing some of the rappers most thoroughly provoking and controversial lyrical content.

Most artists seem to grow more conservative upon reaching a certain level of super-stardom. Lamar, on the other hand, seems intent on highlighting, criticising and interrogating many of the underlying attitudes and behaviours of the society he exists in, even if this process is painful for both the artist and the audience.

Most of the lyrical content throughout DAMN focuses in on racial issues. Lamar does also provide commentary on the shortcomings of capitalism and prescribed gender behaviours. It’s hard to imagine such an artist becoming the mainstream and critical tour de force he is without the current political climate motivating his music.

“Considering the recent growth in anti-immigrant sentiment across the political landscape the fact that a loud and proud Latin song became the monster tune that it did speaks volumes about where the political allegiances of the youth lie.

2017 has also seen many non-traditional forms of rap and rappers emerge into the commercial field. Trap music, also diminutively known as ‘mumble-rap’, has finally reached the top of the Billboard charts after many years of mainstream dismissal. Georgian trio Migos’ second album Culture, released in January and debuting on the top of the Billboard chart, has had a massive part to play in this process.

For many years the West and East coasts of America have held sway over the rap empire, now the emergence of Southern Trap has offered a third voice in the debate. The album reads as a who’s who of Southern trap, with features from Gucci Mane, 2 Chainz and Lil Uzi Vert. It sported three separate charting singles. A very impressive feat from a movement that until this year was considered by many to be hugely unequal to its East and West coast counterparts.

Race was certainly not the only set of politics to dominate popular music in 2017. In a year where the leader of the free world has been caught on tape promoting sexual harassment and countless Hollywood industry leaders have been accused of the same, many pop artists have responded with strong messages of female agency.

“In many ways Cardi B’s ascent to mainstream stardom can be read as running parallel to the growing debate around gender equality”

Next to ‘Despacito’, the most popular song of 2017 is Cardi B’s ‘Bodak Yellow’. In many ways Cardi B’s ascent to mainstream stardom can be read as running parallel to the growing debate around gender equality. Writing and performing from a genre typically populated by males, her dominance in the Billboard chart is in it of itself a challenge to gender norms. So too is the lyrical content of her songs, promoting sexual liberation and a confident body image. It is exactly B’s refusal to reject or even hide her own personal history from her songcraft, even if much of society dictates that she should, that allows her the voice of a 21st century female icon.

When compared to the musings of female pop stars in the 2000s, the messages being emitted from contemporary pop stars such as Cardi B, Beyonce and Adele make it clear just how far the discussion on gender politics has come in such a short space of time.

The fact that Solange Knowles was awarded the Billboard 2017 ’Impact’ award for her stunning third album A Seat At Table is further proof of the matter. An album interwoven with alternative messages of African – American and female empowerment, its nod of approval from the people who run the charts is a large step forward in giving a platform to politically conscious female pop music.

Now that the dust is settling on a tumultuous year, it’s clear that in 2017 music must tap into the every day of the people for it to be popular. Having grown up in a time where pop music consisted of faux-deep sob stories and club bangers it’s nice to know that the political appetites of the common listener have expanded into their taste in music. Now more than ever, people turn toward artists and cultural leaders more so than anyone else to set the example that we all follow. Despite everything else that may be going on in the world, it’s comforting to know that they’re setting the bar so high.

Here’s to another fantastic year in popular music.

Posted on December 7th, 2017

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