, These are our 10 favourite new songs this week
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These are our 10 favourite new songs this week

Here are the best new songs we’ve heard in the past week, tried, tested and ready for your ears.

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1.

Yeule

Eva

Positioning itself as a soundtrack to the most blissful video game in the world, Yeule’s ‘Eva’ wraps the listener up in a gentle world built through glistening synths, ethereal vocals and soft euphoria. Yeule’s latest project Serotonin II is a beautiful journey into experimental sound design and audio immersion but ‘Eva’ is a standout slice of heaven.

– Kelly Doherty

2.

FKA Twigs

Sad Day

FKA Twigs’ MAGDALENE saw release last Friday after much speculation & anticipation. While we have some mixed feelings on the project as a whole, there are some undeniable standout tunes. Take ‘Sad Day’, which is co-produced by both Nicholas Jaar and Skrillex – an all-star lineup to say the least.

‘Sad Day’ gracefully sticks the landing between the schools of deconstructed R&B and piano balladry which so influence Twigs’ recorded material. A gentle falsetto provides the opening gesture into which the rest of arrangement slips in. Those breakbeat drums are right out of Jaar’s toolbox. Twigs’ lyrics and vocals are at their most compelling here, an easy highlight from the album.

– Luke Sharkey

3.

Mango X Mathman

Bread & Butter

“00:00/Another day in the Dub”. So speaks Mango in the first breath of the leading song on Casual Work. ‘Bread & Butter’ is the spoken word piece which frames the context into which the rest of the project neatly fits.

It’s a powerful opening statement, especially when considered in conjunction with its follow-up ‘Deep Blue’. If you thought Casual Work would be content to deal solely with the nighttime antics MxM’s previous singles like ‘No Surrender FM’ and ‘Badman’ have portrayed, ‘Bread & Butter’ is the sobering morning-after moment of realisation that you’ve work in two hours and you’re not sure if you even have the bus fare in your pocket to get there. Just “another day in the Dub”.

– Luke Sharkey

4.

Dua Lipa

Don’t Start Now

Dua Lipa has a bona fide pop hit on her hands with ‘Don’t Start Now’. Maintaining a consistent profile in the breakneck speed pop machine that propelled ‘New Rules’ to superstardom is no easy feat but ‘Don’t Start Now’ is a confident and fresh return from the London based artist. Armed with an irrepressible bassline and a trademark contagious chorus, Dua Lipa flirts with disco and EDM on yet another colossal pop masterclass.

– Kelly Doherty
 

5.

Michael Kiwanuka

Solid Ground

‘Solid Ground’ is one of the closing tracks from British singer-songwriter Michael Kiwanuka’s new album KIWANUKA. It’s a track with the sort of confidence only songs on the tail end of a superb album can have. The conflict has been resolved, closure sought and all that’s really left to do is reflect on what’s transpired. That’s the framework in which to approach ‘Solid Ground’.

It’s just Kiwanuka and Rhodes piano for two-thirds of ‘Solid Ground’, barring the occasional flutter from a violin. The sense of calm is palpable, finally perturbed by cornerstone couplet “Is it over?/ Am I losing solid Ground?” after which the rest of the bluesy arrangement kicks in, sounding in a sort of grim solidarity.

– Luke Sharkey

6.

Zebra Katz

In In In

New York City genre nonconformist Zebra Katz sounds mighty comfortable acting in the role of MC on new single ‘In In In’. There’s more than enough strong bars to justify the hip-hop label. However, the arrangement doesn’t sit nearly as comfortably in the genre, with percussion more reminiscent of UK hard drum and synth splashes out of classic house.

Regardless, the song-writing and lyrics on ‘In In In’ do more than enough to ensure that these disparate elements work neatly together.

– Luke Sharkey

7.

Wiki X Princess Nokia

Dame Aqui

New York rapper Wiki is back with OOFIE, his follow-up to 2017’s excellent No Mountains In Manhattan. Album highlight Dame Aqui sees Wiki teaming up with Princess Nokia for a glassy trip-hop bounce. Wiki’s flow is as natural and unique as ever and Princess Nokia is the perfect match with her relaxed, mellow lilt. ‘Dame Aqui’ doesn’t go anywhere too fast but brings you along with charming ease.

– Kelly Doherty

8.

Sorcha Richardson

High In The Garden

An earworm indie jam off the B-Side of Sorcha Richardson‘s debut LP First Prize Bravery. The vocal melody and flow on ‘High In The Garden’ are instant gems. The bubbly bassline and rhythm section are undeniably toe-tappy. Great indie songwriting.

– Luke Sharkey

9.

Little Scream

Dear Leader

Montreal indie outfit Little Scream‘s new album Speed Queen has produced some of my favourite dreamy indie of the year. ‘Dear Leader’ is the albums’ sometimes sardonic opener. A downtempo plea set to something akin to a marching beat. The lyrics are superb, absolutely unafraid to run fist first into big themes like capitalism, socialism and the ever-pressing notable absence of god in modern life (too busy being risen according to ‘Dear Leader’).

– Luke Sharkey

10.

Easy Life & Arlo Parks

Sangria

Leicester native five-piece Easy Life are up the funk meets neo-soul voodoo they do so well on new single ‘Sangria’. However, this time around they’ve brought in hotly-tipped R&B vocalist Arlo Parks for some guest vocals. Yes.

– Luke Sharkey

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