The RTÉ Choice Music Prize for Irish album of the year takes place this Thursday in Vicar Street. Tickets are available from €28 + fees.

As the same time as the 10 artists nominated take to the stage (and the popular vote-driven, less weighted song of the year winner is announced), the 10 judges will spend their time deliberating the merits of each album in a locked room, so the live performances have no bearing on the outcome. It’s an award that is hard to predict and comes down to the likes and dislikes of the ten particular judges in the room; how passionate they feel about certain genres, lyrics, sounds and what consensus about the best album from the list forms while they are that room.

Recent years have seen worthy wins for Rusangano Family , Soak, The Gloaming, Villagers and Jape. All the recent albums were deemed worthy winners by critics in advance, despite varying degrees of album popularity. So with that in mind, here’s a look at the runners this year.

We start with the list of actual judges who picked the 10 albums below.

Judging Panel

Kate Brennan Harding – Today FM
Martin Byrne – Music Consultant – Glasdrum / ex Other Voices
Stephen Byrne – GoldenPlec
Tracy Clifford – 2FM
Alan Donovan – Red FM
Dave Hanratty – Freelance journalist & broadcaster with NO ENCORE podcast
Hugh Linehan – Irish Times Culture/Arts/Ticket Editor
Ann Marie Shields – BIMM
Lilian Smith – RTE Radio 1
Danny Wilson – Totally Dublin.

As discussed upon the first announcement,  the lack of a Northern Irish judge on the panel has meant that there was less chance that records from Bicep, Joshua Burnside or ASIWYFA on the list (a regional judge would have been more likely to hear these records local to them by osmosis, and put them forward). Choice chairman Tony Clayton-Lea responded to criticism on Twitter about that saying they had an NI judge on the panel who pulled out and who wasn’t replaced due to short notice which is a real shame, and contributes too much Dublin bias overall. Parking that aside for now, let’s look at each album’s chances.

Shortlisted albums

Come On Live Long – In The Still


Come On Live Long’s second album In The Still is a fine record but it felt like it flew under the radar generally speaking with the band premiering the album on Nialler9 and with the band members living in different countries, live dates were few and far between to support the release. So it felt like a surprise that it made the list, especially as the album’s textured tracks are less immediate than the band’s previous album back in 2013.

Does it have a chance?
It feels unlikely that consensus would form in the room over a release that rewards patience and time over immediacy. It’s a good record for sure, but I can’t see this winning over a majority.

Favourite track: ‘In the Still’:


Marlene Enright – Placemats and Second Cuts

Another somewhat surprising but heartening addition to this year’s list that was also premiered on Nialler9. Cork singer-songwriter Enright was formerly a singer with The Hard Ground and her contributions were always a highlight of that band. On her own steam, Enright settles into a comfortable and pleasing groove of songs that bring in organ-lines, spacious arrangements, rolling rhythms to support Enright’s voice which carries a magnetic swirl and focus to it. It’s a charming record with warm tones and well-written songs.

Does it have a chance?
It may be the case that the judges will find this album pleasant but won’t argue passionately for it. One that may have to settle for the live Choice show experience and with an acclaimed album to build on.

Favourite track: ‘123’


Fangclub – Fangclub


The only album on this year’s list on a major label (Universal), Fang Club’s self-titled debut does one thing really well – mine grunge music of the past with updated modern production for an engaging if unvaried rock album.

Does it have a chance?
Grunge and rock aren’t dominant or as vital genres in today’s music landscape as they once were and the judges may inevitably end up comparing the band’s relevance in 2018 to the greats who have done it better 20 to 30 years ago.

Favourite track: ‘Bullethead’:


Lankum – Beneath the Earth and the Sky

The second album from folk miscreants Lankum (formerly Lynched) was released on Rough Trade and offers a slightly more polished take on their punkish trad sound. Here’s a band who are traditional in the way the genre intends covering folk songs of the past alongside new compositions in a gritty and youthful style that marks itself apart from the Dubliners and the Fureys of the world. There’s plenty to enjoy here especially the eight-minute state-of-our-nation ‘Deanta in Eireann’ and the evocative version of folk song ‘What Will We Do When We Have No Money?’ but as an album overall, it jumps between styles and tempos jarringly enough which may work against it as a whole album release.

Does it have a chance?
It certainly does, considering The Gloaming’s contemporary take on trad won three years ago, but it depends on the judges’ overall susceptibility to the band’s take on trad. It is an album of definite Irish extraction, which may help when choosing an Irish album of the year.

Favourite track: ‘Deanta in Eireann’


James Vincent McMorrow – True Care


The fourth album from James Vincent McMorrow arrived so hot on the heels on his previous album that it was a surprise  announced a week before release. As such, it was also made in a different way to McMorrow’s other long players. Made quickly and self-recorded over the course of five months, mean that the album is unburdened by any commercial expectation and features some of McMorrow’s most interesting work. The hasty production also means that the songs don’t burn as clear or as bright as his last album We Move, which had modern R&B production. True Care is more intimate, less concerned with big gestures and lyrically, more interested in home truths. So much so that the artist annotated the album’s lyrics on Genius in advance of release.

Does it have a chance?
The Choice judges have not proved to be people who traditionally award the prize to repeat nominees. McMorrow’s been nominated for every album thus far and has yet to win it. The Choice chairman will tell the judges that you decide on each album’s own merit but it may help sway the room in a year where there’s no one obvious winner. It also helps that the album is McMorrow’s truest creative expression in long-form yet. A really good chance this will win.

Favourite track: ‘National’


New Jackson – From Night to Night


David Kitt’s long-awaited debut as New Jackson didn’t disappoint for fans of his night-time analogue electronica. Kitt has constructed a deft collection of dancefloor-centric music that draws from the worlds of house and techno without sacrificing its own identity. It’s an album that has a soft nocturnal edge. Some of the best New Jackson songs thus far in my estimation, were released before or after the album on EPs and singles, like ‘Having A Coke With You’, ‘There Will Always Be This Love’ or ‘Sat  Around Here Waiting’ being personal favourites but the album overall works as a long-player of two sides.

Does it have a chance?
A full electronic dancefloor album is always going to have a hard time getting a winning consensus from ten disparate judges so it feels unlikely. A worthy inclusion on the list but unlikely to be first choice.

Favourite track: ‘From Night To Night’.


Otherkin – OK

The Dublin indie-rock band Otherkin feel like a band out of time with what’s going on around them. Here’s a band who write capable and catchy indie-rock songs with pop-leaning choruses but it feels in thrall to a scene and sound that has long since fallen out of favour – namely London and NME of the late 90s. The songs sound ripe for Rimmel London ad placements. While it’s a fun and highly-targetted listen, OK doesn’t bring anything new to the table. Lyrically, there’s not much more than a veneer of melody at play.

Does it have a chance?
A fine singalong indie rock album in a historic sea of them.

Favourite track: ‘Ay Ay’


Fionn Regan – The Meetings of the Waters

A curious release from Fionn Regan. Five years since his last full-length and it sounds like time away has left him with a renewed sense of purpose. The Meetings Of The Waters feels like a stepping stone to a new path for Regan as opposed to the final destination. Ditching the Dylan-influence completely, the album largely features meditative spacious folk music that sustains quietly like smouldering embers and a centrepiece of three tracks with more layered rock music-style songs.

Does it have a chance?
Doubtful. The album’s meandering style is miles away from the folk singer-songwriter sound that made his name, and while that is not a bad thing, The Meetings of the Waters feels like an artist in transition and I think the judges will recognise that.

Favourite track: ‘The Meetings of The Waters’.


Ships – Precession

Ships’ debut was my favourite Irish album of last year. Characterised by intricately-produced synthesiser-driven electronic pop, the songs here have groove, funk and space, which draws from the past and sounds very much of the now. Whether its the gleaming disco-funk of ‘All Will Be’, the psychedelic space-rock of ‘I Can Never’ which is reminiscent of Tame Impala, the deep peaks of ‘Around This World’ or the electro delay of ‘None Of It Real’, McGrath and Cullen deliver commanding vocal performances too that bury these triumphant tunes deeper.

Does it have a chance?
A dark horse contender for sure. It’s well-produced, engaging, unique and lyrically considered. I would love to see this win and it very well may.

Favourite track: ‘All Will Be’


Talos – Wild Alee

Cork man Eoin French’s debut as Talos makes towering glacial soundscapes that feel built for his falsetto voice to rest upon. At its peaks, the Ross Dowling-produced album has slow-building anthemic choruses and many moments of instrumental beauty in its midst, that draws on a perfect storm of swirling sonics, guitar, synths and electronics. French’s voice is a powerhouse too – a breaking, powerful instrument that needs little else at times to engage with the listener.

Does it have a chance?
It’s certainly a beautiful album and one that has been critically very well-received. I just have a feeling that overall, it may be viewed as not having quite enough for the judges to argue on its behalf when it comes down to whittling down the albums to a final three.

Favourite track: ‘Odyssey’


So who will win?

After considering every album on the list, I think it’s  James Vincent McMorrow, Ships or Lankum in that order.

Posted on March 6th, 2018

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The 10 nominees for this year’s RTÉ Choice Music Prize album of the year will perform at this year ceremony which takes place at Vicar Street on Thursday March 8th.

Nominees and performers include:
  • Come On Live Long
  • Marlene Enright
  • Fangclub
  • Lankum
  • James Vincent McMorrow
  • New Jackson
  • Otherkin
  • Fionn Regan
  • Ships
  • Talos

Tickets for the Choice Music Prize live event on March 8th in Vicar Street are available from Ticketmaster and priced €28 plus fees.

Posted on February 7th, 2018

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The RTÉ Choice Music Prize have announced the 10 albums shortlisted for Irish album of the year today as revealed on Tracy Clifford’s 2FM show by Choice chairman Tony Clayton-Lea.

The winning album will be revealed at Vicar Street on March 8th after a judging panel deliberation.

The 10 albums shortlisted by the judges for Irish album of the year are:

Shortlisted albums

Come On Live Long – In The Still (self released)
Marlene Enright – Placemats and Second Cuts (self released)
Fangclub – Fangclub (Universal)
Lankum – Beneath the Earth and the Sky (Rough Trade)
James Vincent McMorrow – True Care (Faction Records)
New Jackson – From Night to Night (All City)
Otherkin – OK (Rubyworks)
Fionn Regan – The Meetings of the Waters (Abbey Records)
Ships – Precession (Ships Music)
Talos – Wild Alee (Feel Good Lost)

A Spotify playlist of nominated album highlights

Reaction?

A very strong list this year. Great to see Ships, Talos, Come On Live Long, Marlene Enright and New Jackson in there – many of which were featured in my Irish albums of the year. We live in a deluge of new music so for those albums to get even to judge’s ears now is no mean feat, not least make an impression. Independently-released albums have to swim upstream and rely on sites like this, word-of-mouth and hard graft to make a lasting impression beyond the week of release in the first place.

Missing from the list? Northern Irish acts didn’t get a look in once again. The NI Album of the Year from Joshua Burnside doesn’t feature, nor does the brilliant debut album from Bicep or And So I Watch You From Afar most notably. It seems the NI / ROI divide remains even if it has certainly improved in recent years.

2017 wasn’t a year that many Irish major label acts released an album save for U2, Van Morrison, Niall Horan, The Coronas and The Script. The Script was pretty much panned across the board and U2’s Songs Of Experience received mixed reviews. It’s December release date may not have helped.

One notable act whose huge success didn’t translate to a Choice Music Prize nomination? Picture This. They may be able to sell out big venues all over the country but this award is for album alone and the critics didn’t pluck for the Kildare boys.

No room for trad acts like Cormac Begley or Martin Hayes and Damien Dempsey fell short of the judges.

About the Choice Music Prize

The winning act will receive €10,000, a prize fund which has been provided by The Irish Music Rights Organisation (IMRO) and The Irish Recorded Music Association (IRMA). All of the shortlisted acts will receive a specially commissioned award. RAAP, Culture Ireland & Golden Discs are also official project partners.

RTÉ Choice Music Prize – Irish Song of The Year 2017

The shortlist for the RTÉ Choice Music Prize – Irish Song of The Year 2017 will be announced on Wednesday 31st January 2018. A special event featuring exclusive performances from both Album of the Year and Song of the Year nominees will be held in Dublin’s Tramline venue that evening.

Choice Live Event – tickets

Tickets for the Choice Music Prize live event on March 8th in Vicar Street are available from Ticketmaster and priced €28 plus fees.

RTÉ 2FM Radio support

RTÉ 2FM will celebrate the announcement of the shortlist across its schedule throughout the day with All Irish Music All Day from 6am to midnight. Louise McSharry will present a two-hour special programme on this year’s RTÉ Choice Music Prize, Irish Album of the Year 2017 shortlist from 8-10pm this evening. RTÉ 2FM will continue to mark the announcement of the shortlist this week and beyond through a mix of airplay of tracks from the shortlisted albums, interviews with this year’s shortlisted artists and live performances.

Live event broadcast on RTE radio and TV

As part of the partnership with RTÉ, the event will be broadcast live on RTÉ 2FM in a special four-hour extended programme from 7-11pm and on RTÉ2 as part of a special RTÉ Choice Music Prize TV programme, approximately one week later.

Judging Panel

Kate Brennan Harding – Today FM
Martin Byrne – Music Consultant
Stephen Byrne – Golden Plec
Tracy Clifford – 2fm
Alan Donovan – Red FM
Dave Hanratty – Freelance journalist & broadcaster with NO ENCORE podcast
Hugh Linehan – Irish Times Culture/Arts/Ticket Editor
Ann Marie Shields – BIMM
Lilian Smith – RTE Radio 1
Danny Wilson – Totally Dublin

Previous winners of the Choice Music Prize

2016: Rusangano Family
2015: Soak
2014: The Gloaming
2013: Villagers
2012: Jape
2011: Delorentos
2010: Two Door Cinema Club
2009: Adrian Crowley
2008: Jape
2007: Super Extra Bonus Party
2006: The Divine Comedy
2005: Julie Feeney

Posted on January 10th, 2018

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Placemats and Second Cuts was one of the finer records released out of Ireland this year and it came from Cork’s Marlene Enright, who also is known for her work with The Hard Ground.

The album, premiered here, traded in classic songwriting, folk, indie, roots and Americana.

O Emperor’s Paul Savage filmed and edited this new video for the song ‘Bay Tree’ and it operates as |a surrealist offering that plays on the idea of life flashing before one’s eyes, looking at the afterlife as a waiting room, a place to watch back one’s life and examine what happened.”

Enright:

“This song gradually came together over a few weeks in Spring 2016. It’s rare that I realise what exactly I’m writing about until I’m finished a song, I’ve removed myself from it and a few months down the line I look back on it. Hindsight can bring clarity to periods of time when your mind was foggy and you didn’t know your head from your elbow. This song was one that was written in the midst of much fog. It’s about indecision, confusion, self-doubt and feeling crippled by all three. The title is part of the bridge of the song “Love will crown no one from the Bay Tree, it will give you a fire to stoke in the cold / It will pull on your hand and cushion your soles”. Wreaths of Laurel or Bay were used in ancient Greece and Rome to crown a victor. Here I was just trying to get across the idea that one doesn’t always feel victorious in love or elated but rather, more importantly, willing to give and receive comfort and support”

Savage:

“The idea for the video came while sitting in a doctor’s waiting room and flicking through old fashion magazines. I liked how fashion advertising often uses bold or unorthodox framing of the subjects in a composition to grab the viewers attention. I was also inspired by the painting “Figure in the window” by Salvador Dali which has a ‘frame within a frame’ composition and has the affect of making the viewer also part of the picture.”

Live Dates

Enright plays Live at St. Lukes, Cork – Double bill with Jack O’Rourke – Friday 15th December – Tickets €20 on sale from https://www.liveatstlukes.com

Posted on October 12th, 2017

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Returning for a second year in 2017, Cork multimedia collective Generic People resume their curatorial duties at Electric Picnic’s Hazel Wood stage for its After Dark programme, running throughout the weekend of the festival, September 1st-3rd.

Establishing itself as the festival’s spot for eclectic entertainment during the day, the Hazel Wood leads festival-goers away from the usual madness, with interactive theatre and performance art at the fore. At night, it becomes an audiovisual experience, augmented by incandescent visuals & lighting.

Following on from last year’s debut excursion, the stage features a wide and varied selection of Irish artists, with the lineup unveiled exclusively below.


Onstage throughout the weekend will be: trip-hop/electronic outfit
Freezer Room with special guests; Choice Prize nominee Bantum, joined by visual artist Le Tissier for a live A/V set; veteran Irish crooner Jack L; Hard Ground singer-songwriter Marlene Enright; legendary Leeside record-slinger Jim ‘X’ Comet; world-travelled troubadour Tiz McNamara; former RTÉ 2FM Play the Picnic winners Tanjier; transatlantic soul sound heroes, The Niall McCabe Band; and singer-songwriter Máiréad, launching her comeback album at midnight on opening night.

Meanwhile, manning the wheels of mechanised steel: the living embodiment of low-budget excess, Humans Of The Sesh, as part of a theatrical presentation; Cork house collective Fleece; and stage curators Generic People. In addition to all of this, the stage will feature intimate fireside sessions with a selection of artists throughout the weekend.

A special preview of proceedings, alongside the official audiovisual lineup announcement, is available in the video above. For more info on Generic People, click here.

Posted on July 20th, 2017

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Marlene Enright is a Cork singer and songwriter who, when not playing with The Hard Ground, has established her own place in Irish music over a series of singles that have traded in classic songwriting, folk, indie, roots and Americana.

Enright’s solo album Placemats And Second Cuts is a rich release that combines all of the above into a cohesive whole. Harmonies, organ-lines, spacious arrangements, rolling rhythms and Enright’s voice which carries a magnetic swirl and focus to it.

Previous singles ‘Alchemy’, ‘123’, ‘When The Water Is Hot’ and ‘Underbelly’ fit snugly alongside new songs like the warm-toned ‘Bay Tree’, the gentle ‘Sadness’ and the atmospheric ‘Home’.

“Hindsight has made me realise that it’s a much more self-reflective album than I initially realised. It speaks of self-doubt, dancing the fine line between feeling comfortable in your own skin and feeling totally lost at sea, indecisiveness, the battle between strength and weakness, passion and apathy, belonging and isolation and self-acceptance.”

Live Dates

The White Horse, Ballincollig – Friday 24th March – €12
The Mariner, Bantry – Saturday 25th March – €10
The Spirit Store, Dundalk – Wednesday 5th April
Whelans, Dublin – Thursday 6th April – €12
Dolans, Limerick – Friday 7th April – €10
Coughlan’s, Cork – Thursday 13th April -€12
St. John’s Theatre, Listowel – Friday 28th April – €12/€15

Posted on March 20th, 2017

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One of Ireland’s most promising musicians, Cork lady Marlene Enright has released a fine series of singles in the last year and a bit.

Enright will release her debut album Placemats and Second Cuts on March 24th this year.

Like previous singles ‘Alchemy’, ‘Underbelly’ and ‘When The Water Is Hot’, ‘123’ draws from indie, folk and roots music influences and Enright’s bright vocals to create a memorable classic pop tune.

“I was thinking that my destiny // Would fall from the clouds right at my feet // I’d pick enough from the apple tree // And I’d go on the count of 123”

‘123’ is out on February 3rd.

Marlene Enright Live Dates

Levis Corner House, Ballydehob – Friday 3rd March
The White Horse, Ballincollig – Friday 24th March
The Mariner, Bantry – Saturday 25th March
The Spirit Store, Dundalk – Wednesday 5th April
Whelans, Dublin – Thursday 6th April
Dolans, Limerick – Friday 7th April

Posted on January 16th, 2017

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When not singing with Cork band The Hard Ground, Marlene Enright has been releasing a fine line of solo singles of late.

‘Alchemy’ is her third such release, which trails her debut album Placemats and Second Cuts due out in March.

“I hold my head high // And I look calamity straight in the eye,” Enright sings.

Hear also:

Underbelly / ‘When The Water Is Hot’

Marlene Enright live

November 19 – supporting John Blek in John Cleere’s Bar & Theatre, Kilkenny
November 25 – supporting John Blek in Coughlan’s Bar, Cork
November 26 – supporting John Blek in Phil Grimes, Waterford
December 2 – Other Voices Music Trail, Dingle
December 3 – Other Voices Music Trail, Dingle (afternoon)
December 3 – supporting John Blek in Whelan’s, Dublin
December 16 – supporting Declan O’Rourke, Kilkee

Posted on November 15th, 2016

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When not playing music with Cork band The Hard Ground, Marlene Enright has recently been delving into solo material. For her second single, the singer moves on from the rootsy threatening vibe of ‘When The Water Is Hot’ (below) to more direct communication.

‘Underbelly’ leads with Enright’s bright voice and grows with harmonic sweetness, as she strives to find out exactly what has happened around her.

The single is released tomorrow and it will feature on a debut album coming in January 2017.

Posted on May 12th, 2016

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