Super Extra Bonus Party will be joined by very special guests Ships, Phare and The Comstocks for a hometown show at JRB’s in Newbridge on June 16th.

Super Extra Bonus Party made their return last November with ‘Switzerland’ which was then followed by ‘Purple Heart’, both songs on Kildare based label 045 Recordings.

Tickets go on sale Friday 18th May priced at €10/€14

Go to upstairsatjrbs.ie for more information.

Posted on May 17th, 2018

Tags:

Artists: , , ,

Winner of the IMRO small festival of the year award for 2017 and one of the most endearing festivals in Ireland, Another Love Story is back once more and have announced their music lineup for the festival which takes place at the grounds of Killyon Manor, Co Meath from August 17th – 19th 2018.

The lineup includes:

  • Mammal Hands
  • Cloud Castle Lake
  • The Lost Brothers
  • Ships
  • O Emperor
  • Mount Alaska
  • Somadrone
  • R Kitt
  • Pillow Queens
  • Davy Kehoe
  • Solkatt
  • Dowry
  • Joshua Burnside
  • Anna Mieke
  • Sorcha Richardson
  • Deaf Joe
  • Robert John Ardiff
  • Nava
  • Roe
  • Inni K
  • The Silken Same
  • Sun Collective
  • Attention Bebe
  • Interskalatic
  • Graham Mc Sweeny
  • Simon O’Reilly
  • Royal Yellow
  • The Glasshouse Collective
  • Donal Dineen
  • Eddie Kay
  • Lil Dave
  • My House DJs
  • Bodytonic DJs
  • Nialler9
  • The Als Shift Shack with Cian O’C, Claire F, Emma K, Andrew K, Neil F, Emmet C, Paddy D, Tom R

Tier 4 tickets priced at €190+ are available now via Eventbrite.ie.

Other Occurrences :
The Shift Shack | The Library By Yhrf | The Front Room | The Big Stretchy
For Conor | This Must Be The Place | My House Presents : Way Out There |
& More Tba

Regular and boutique camping on offer.

Other Details
Return Bus from Dublin To ALS : €18
Camper van tickets (very limited) : €20
No Sunday camping – event runs 19.00 Fri Aug 18th – 19.00 Sun Aug 20th.
Under 12’s go free accompanied by adult
12-18 year olds are not permitted
Dogs Free!

Posted on April 19th, 2018

Artists: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

‘The Hop House’ is coming to Dublin this April and May which will feature live performances, DJ sets, interactive art stations, and food from Hang Dai, The Big Blue Bus and the Brazilian Kitchen in various venues across the city centre.

The event breakdown looks like this:

April 13th at The Bernard Shaw

  • Yankari Afrobeat Collective (Live)
  • Watermelon DJs
  • Telephone DJs

April 26th at Wigwam

  • Jimmy Rouge (Orange Tree Edits)
  • LUMO DJs
  • Telephone DJs

May 11th at Whelan’s

  • SHIPS (Live)
  • LUMO DJs
  • Telephone DJs

Tickets priced at priced at €12 per event are available now via Eventbrite.ie

Posted on April 5th, 2018

Tags:

Artists: , , ,

Last night in Vicar Street, the RTÉ Choice Music Prize, the Irish album of the year, was awarded to Ships.

The band, Sorca Mcgrath and Simon Cullen, were awarded the prize for their album Precession, and they were given the €10,000 prize.

While the live event was happening, the judges locked in a room at the Morrison hotel, decided that Precession was the best album in a year over albums from Fionn Regan, New Jackson, Lankum and Talos. James Vincent McMorrow was left once again without the prize in his fourth Choice nomination.

I made my predictions earlier in the week and called Ships “a dark horse contender”. It was my favourite Irish album of last year so it was a pleasure to hear that the judges agreed on this occasion. Ships self-released their album after a Fundit campaign. The album is beautifully-produced, engaging, unique and lyrically considered. Congrats to Sorca and Simon.

Ships received a cheque for €10,000, a prize which has been provided by the Irish Music Rights Organisation (IMRO) and the Irish Recorded Music Association (IRMA) – as well as a specially-commissioned award.

Chasing Abbey also won the RTÉ Choice Music Prize Irish Song of the Year 2017 in a public vote for their song ‘That Good Thing’.

RTÉ2 will broadcast a one-hour TV highlights programme of the RTÉ Choice Music Prize featuring performances from the acts and interviews by Bláthnaid Treacy on Sunday March 18th at 11pm.

Posted on March 9th, 2018

Tags:

Artists:

The RTÉ Choice Music Prize for Irish album of the year takes place this Thursday in Vicar Street. Tickets are available from €28 + fees.

As the same time as the 10 artists nominated take to the stage (and the popular vote-driven, less weighted song of the year winner is announced), the 10 judges will spend their time deliberating the merits of each album in a locked room, so the live performances have no bearing on the outcome. It’s an award that is hard to predict and comes down to the likes and dislikes of the ten particular judges in the room; how passionate they feel about certain genres, lyrics, sounds and what consensus about the best album from the list forms while they are that room.

Recent years have seen worthy wins for Rusangano Family , Soak, The Gloaming, Villagers and Jape. All the recent albums were deemed worthy winners by critics in advance, despite varying degrees of album popularity. So with that in mind, here’s a look at the runners this year.

We start with the list of actual judges who picked the 10 albums below.

Judging Panel

Kate Brennan Harding – Today FM
Martin Byrne – Music Consultant – Glasdrum / ex Other Voices
Stephen Byrne – GoldenPlec
Tracy Clifford – 2FM
Alan Donovan – Red FM
Dave Hanratty – Freelance journalist & broadcaster with NO ENCORE podcast
Hugh Linehan – Irish Times Culture/Arts/Ticket Editor
Ann Marie Shields – BIMM
Lilian Smith – RTE Radio 1
Danny Wilson – Totally Dublin.

As discussed upon the first announcement,  the lack of a Northern Irish judge on the panel has meant that there was less chance that records from Bicep, Joshua Burnside or ASIWYFA on the list (a regional judge would have been more likely to hear these records local to them by osmosis, and put them forward). Choice chairman Tony Clayton-Lea responded to criticism on Twitter about that saying they had an NI judge on the panel who pulled out and who wasn’t replaced due to short notice which is a real shame, and contributes too much Dublin bias overall. Parking that aside for now, let’s look at each album’s chances.

Shortlisted albums

Come On Live Long – In The Still


Come On Live Long’s second album In The Still is a fine record but it felt like it flew under the radar generally speaking with the band premiering the album on Nialler9 and with the band members living in different countries, live dates were few and far between to support the release. So it felt like a surprise that it made the list, especially as the album’s textured tracks are less immediate than the band’s previous album back in 2013.

Does it have a chance?
It feels unlikely that consensus would form in the room over a release that rewards patience and time over immediacy. It’s a good record for sure, but I can’t see this winning over a majority.

Favourite track: ‘In the Still’:


Marlene Enright – Placemats and Second Cuts

Another somewhat surprising but heartening addition to this year’s list that was also premiered on Nialler9. Cork singer-songwriter Enright was formerly a singer with The Hard Ground and her contributions were always a highlight of that band. On her own steam, Enright settles into a comfortable and pleasing groove of songs that bring in organ-lines, spacious arrangements, rolling rhythms to support Enright’s voice which carries a magnetic swirl and focus to it. It’s a charming record with warm tones and well-written songs.

Does it have a chance?
It may be the case that the judges will find this album pleasant but won’t argue passionately for it. One that may have to settle for the live Choice show experience and with an acclaimed album to build on.

Favourite track: ‘123’


Fangclub – Fangclub


The only album on this year’s list on a major label (Universal), Fang Club’s self-titled debut does one thing really well – mine grunge music of the past with updated modern production for an engaging if unvaried rock album.

Does it have a chance?
Grunge and rock aren’t dominant or as vital genres in today’s music landscape as they once were and the judges may inevitably end up comparing the band’s relevance in 2018 to the greats who have done it better 20 to 30 years ago.

Favourite track: ‘Bullethead’:


Lankum – Beneath the Earth and the Sky

The second album from folk miscreants Lankum (formerly Lynched) was released on Rough Trade and offers a slightly more polished take on their punkish trad sound. Here’s a band who are traditional in the way the genre intends covering folk songs of the past alongside new compositions in a gritty and youthful style that marks itself apart from the Dubliners and the Fureys of the world. There’s plenty to enjoy here especially the eight-minute state-of-our-nation ‘Deanta in Eireann’ and the evocative version of folk song ‘What Will We Do When We Have No Money?’ but as an album overall, it jumps between styles and tempos jarringly enough which may work against it as a whole album release.

Does it have a chance?
It certainly does, considering The Gloaming’s contemporary take on trad won three years ago, but it depends on the judges’ overall susceptibility to the band’s take on trad. It is an album of definite Irish extraction, which may help when choosing an Irish album of the year.

Favourite track: ‘Deanta in Eireann’


James Vincent McMorrow – True Care


The fourth album from James Vincent McMorrow arrived so hot on the heels on his previous album that it was a surprise  announced a week before release. As such, it was also made in a different way to McMorrow’s other long players. Made quickly and self-recorded over the course of five months, mean that the album is unburdened by any commercial expectation and features some of McMorrow’s most interesting work. The hasty production also means that the songs don’t burn as clear or as bright as his last album We Move, which had modern R&B production. True Care is more intimate, less concerned with big gestures and lyrically, more interested in home truths. So much so that the artist annotated the album’s lyrics on Genius in advance of release.

Does it have a chance?
The Choice judges have not proved to be people who traditionally award the prize to repeat nominees. McMorrow’s been nominated for every album thus far and has yet to win it. The Choice chairman will tell the judges that you decide on each album’s own merit but it may help sway the room in a year where there’s no one obvious winner. It also helps that the album is McMorrow’s truest creative expression in long-form yet. A really good chance this will win.

Favourite track: ‘National’


New Jackson – From Night to Night


David Kitt’s long-awaited debut as New Jackson didn’t disappoint for fans of his night-time analogue electronica. Kitt has constructed a deft collection of dancefloor-centric music that draws from the worlds of house and techno without sacrificing its own identity. It’s an album that has a soft nocturnal edge. Some of the best New Jackson songs thus far in my estimation, were released before or after the album on EPs and singles, like ‘Having A Coke With You’, ‘There Will Always Be This Love’ or ‘Sat  Around Here Waiting’ being personal favourites but the album overall works as a long-player of two sides.

Does it have a chance?
A full electronic dancefloor album is always going to have a hard time getting a winning consensus from ten disparate judges so it feels unlikely. A worthy inclusion on the list but unlikely to be first choice.

Favourite track: ‘From Night To Night’.


Otherkin – OK

The Dublin indie-rock band Otherkin feel like a band out of time with what’s going on around them. Here’s a band who write capable and catchy indie-rock songs with pop-leaning choruses but it feels in thrall to a scene and sound that has long since fallen out of favour – namely London and NME of the late 90s. The songs sound ripe for Rimmel London ad placements. While it’s a fun and highly-targetted listen, OK doesn’t bring anything new to the table. Lyrically, there’s not much more than a veneer of melody at play.

Does it have a chance?
A fine singalong indie rock album in a historic sea of them.

Favourite track: ‘Ay Ay’


Fionn Regan – The Meetings of the Waters

A curious release from Fionn Regan. Five years since his last full-length and it sounds like time away has left him with a renewed sense of purpose. The Meetings Of The Waters feels like a stepping stone to a new path for Regan as opposed to the final destination. Ditching the Dylan-influence completely, the album largely features meditative spacious folk music that sustains quietly like smouldering embers and a centrepiece of three tracks with more layered rock music-style songs.

Does it have a chance?
Doubtful. The album’s meandering style is miles away from the folk singer-songwriter sound that made his name, and while that is not a bad thing, The Meetings of the Waters feels like an artist in transition and I think the judges will recognise that.

Favourite track: ‘The Meetings of The Waters’.


Ships – Precession

Ships’ debut was my favourite Irish album of last year. Characterised by intricately-produced synthesiser-driven electronic pop, the songs here have groove, funk and space, which draws from the past and sounds very much of the now. Whether its the gleaming disco-funk of ‘All Will Be’, the psychedelic space-rock of ‘I Can Never’ which is reminiscent of Tame Impala, the deep peaks of ‘Around This World’ or the electro delay of ‘None Of It Real’, McGrath and Cullen deliver commanding vocal performances too that bury these triumphant tunes deeper.

Does it have a chance?
A dark horse contender for sure. It’s well-produced, engaging, unique and lyrically considered. I would love to see this win and it very well may.

Favourite track: ‘All Will Be’


Talos – Wild Alee

Cork man Eoin French’s debut as Talos makes towering glacial soundscapes that feel built for his falsetto voice to rest upon. At its peaks, the Ross Dowling-produced album has slow-building anthemic choruses and many moments of instrumental beauty in its midst, that draws on a perfect storm of swirling sonics, guitar, synths and electronics. French’s voice is a powerhouse too – a breaking, powerful instrument that needs little else at times to engage with the listener.

Does it have a chance?
It’s certainly a beautiful album and one that has been critically very well-received. I just have a feeling that overall, it may be viewed as not having quite enough for the judges to argue on its behalf when it comes down to whittling down the albums to a final three.

Favourite track: ‘Odyssey’


So who will win?

After considering every album on the list, I think it’s  James Vincent McMorrow, Ships or Lankum in that order.

Posted on March 6th, 2018

Tags:

Artists: , , , , , , ,

The 10 nominees for this year’s RTÉ Choice Music Prize album of the year will perform at this year ceremony which takes place at Vicar Street on Thursday March 8th.

Nominees and performers include:
  • Come On Live Long
  • Marlene Enright
  • Fangclub
  • Lankum
  • James Vincent McMorrow
  • New Jackson
  • Otherkin
  • Fionn Regan
  • Ships
  • Talos

Tickets for the Choice Music Prize live event on March 8th in Vicar Street are available from Ticketmaster and priced €28 plus fees.

Posted on February 7th, 2018

Tags:

Artists: , , , , , , , , ,

Castlepalooza has announced its first lineup for the August Bank Holiday this year and Charleville Castle will feature !!! (Chk Chk Chk) – a particularly good booking and the only Irish festival date for All Tvvins this year.

  • All Tvvins
  • !!! Chk Chk Chk
  • Detroit Swindle
  • Ships
  • New Jackson
  • Space Dimension Controller
  • Super Extra Bonus Party
  • Boots & Kats
  • I Draw Slow
  • Seamus Fogarty
  • Mix & Fairbanks
  • Fontaines DC

LAUGHTER LAB

  • Rubberbandits
  • Karl Spain
  • Eric Lalor
  • Colin Murphy
  • Gearoid Farrelly

Weekend tickets are available from €109 with no camping or €139 with camping.

Posted on January 29th, 2018

Tags:

Artists: , , , ,

The RTÉ Choice Music Prize have announced the 10 albums shortlisted for Irish album of the year today as revealed on Tracy Clifford’s 2FM show by Choice chairman Tony Clayton-Lea.

The winning album will be revealed at Vicar Street on March 8th after a judging panel deliberation.

The 10 albums shortlisted by the judges for Irish album of the year are:

Shortlisted albums

Come On Live Long – In The Still (self released)
Marlene Enright – Placemats and Second Cuts (self released)
Fangclub – Fangclub (Universal)
Lankum – Beneath the Earth and the Sky (Rough Trade)
James Vincent McMorrow – True Care (Faction Records)
New Jackson – From Night to Night (All City)
Otherkin – OK (Rubyworks)
Fionn Regan – The Meetings of the Waters (Abbey Records)
Ships – Precession (Ships Music)
Talos – Wild Alee (Feel Good Lost)

A Spotify playlist of nominated album highlights

Reaction?

A very strong list this year. Great to see Ships, Talos, Come On Live Long, Marlene Enright and New Jackson in there – many of which were featured in my Irish albums of the year. We live in a deluge of new music so for those albums to get even to judge’s ears now is no mean feat, not least make an impression. Independently-released albums have to swim upstream and rely on sites like this, word-of-mouth and hard graft to make a lasting impression beyond the week of release in the first place.

Missing from the list? Northern Irish acts didn’t get a look in once again. The NI Album of the Year from Joshua Burnside doesn’t feature, nor does the brilliant debut album from Bicep or And So I Watch You From Afar most notably. It seems the NI / ROI divide remains even if it has certainly improved in recent years.

2017 wasn’t a year that many Irish major label acts released an album save for U2, Van Morrison, Niall Horan, The Coronas and The Script. The Script was pretty much panned across the board and U2’s Songs Of Experience received mixed reviews. It’s December release date may not have helped.

One notable act whose huge success didn’t translate to a Choice Music Prize nomination? Picture This. They may be able to sell out big venues all over the country but this award is for album alone and the critics didn’t pluck for the Kildare boys.

No room for trad acts like Cormac Begley or Martin Hayes and Damien Dempsey fell short of the judges.

About the Choice Music Prize

The winning act will receive €10,000, a prize fund which has been provided by The Irish Music Rights Organisation (IMRO) and The Irish Recorded Music Association (IRMA). All of the shortlisted acts will receive a specially commissioned award. RAAP, Culture Ireland & Golden Discs are also official project partners.

RTÉ Choice Music Prize – Irish Song of The Year 2017

The shortlist for the RTÉ Choice Music Prize – Irish Song of The Year 2017 will be announced on Wednesday 31st January 2018. A special event featuring exclusive performances from both Album of the Year and Song of the Year nominees will be held in Dublin’s Tramline venue that evening.

Choice Live Event – tickets

Tickets for the Choice Music Prize live event on March 8th in Vicar Street are available from Ticketmaster and priced €28 plus fees.

RTÉ 2FM Radio support

RTÉ 2FM will celebrate the announcement of the shortlist across its schedule throughout the day with All Irish Music All Day from 6am to midnight. Louise McSharry will present a two-hour special programme on this year’s RTÉ Choice Music Prize, Irish Album of the Year 2017 shortlist from 8-10pm this evening. RTÉ 2FM will continue to mark the announcement of the shortlist this week and beyond through a mix of airplay of tracks from the shortlisted albums, interviews with this year’s shortlisted artists and live performances.

Live event broadcast on RTE radio and TV

As part of the partnership with RTÉ, the event will be broadcast live on RTÉ 2FM in a special four-hour extended programme from 7-11pm and on RTÉ2 as part of a special RTÉ Choice Music Prize TV programme, approximately one week later.

Judging Panel

Kate Brennan Harding – Today FM
Martin Byrne – Music Consultant
Stephen Byrne – Golden Plec
Tracy Clifford – 2fm
Alan Donovan – Red FM
Dave Hanratty – Freelance journalist & broadcaster with NO ENCORE podcast
Hugh Linehan – Irish Times Culture/Arts/Ticket Editor
Ann Marie Shields – BIMM
Lilian Smith – RTE Radio 1
Danny Wilson – Totally Dublin

Previous winners of the Choice Music Prize

2016: Rusangano Family
2015: Soak
2014: The Gloaming
2013: Villagers
2012: Jape
2011: Delorentos
2010: Two Door Cinema Club
2009: Adrian Crowley
2008: Jape
2007: Super Extra Bonus Party
2006: The Divine Comedy
2005: Julie Feeney

Posted on January 10th, 2018

Tags:

Artists: , , , , , , ,

2017 Best of | Best songs | Best albums | Irish albums | Irish songs | Club tracks | Guest selections


Here are my 25 favourite Irish albums from 2017 whittled down from a shortlist of 40 or so. Number 1 was a surefire since I heard it earlier this year but there were a few late addition entries released in the last few months that made it near the top.


Tower Records

25.

Otherkin – OK

It’s increasingly hard to stand out in rock music in 2017 beyond genre die-hards and Otherkin are the pick of the Irish bunch when it comes to old-fashioned guitar music (though Fangclub and Gypsies On The Autobahn came close). There’s not much radical at play here – these are catchy very well-produced rock’n’roll songs you’d imagine could soundtrack an ad with ease.


24.

Fionn Regan

Five years since his last full-length and it sounds like time away has left Fionn Regan with a renewed sense of purpose. The Meetings Of The Waters feels like a stepping stone to a new path for Regan. Ditching the Dylan-influence completely, the album largely features meditative spacious folk music that sustains quietly like smouldering embers and a centrepiece of three tracks with more layered rock music-style songs.


23.

Having moved from pensive singer-songwriter to elegiac composer/songwriter a few albums ago, the Galway artist Crowley has transitioned once again, with the help of The Gloaming’s Thomas Bartlett who produced Dark Eyed Messenger. Barlett counselled Crowley to make the album without his trusted guitar. He obliged and the results sound utterly beguiling.


22.

The Gloaming fiddle player’s latest project saw him convene in an 18th century house in Bantry with frequent collaborator Dennis Cahill (guitars) and New Yorkers Doug Wieselman (bass clarinet, Anthony & The Johnsons and Laurie Anderson) and Liz Knowles (hardanger d’amore), with a fire going at both sides of The Blue Room (the album is called after it) and the quartet’s recording process involved playing each traditional piece repeatedly and allowing something different to emerge in the process. Another worthy inclusion from a master.


21.

Keith Mannion’s SPLH project has morphed from bedroom electronic solo endeavour to a full live band in recent years and this year’s album When I See You…Ice Cream! on Strange Brew Rekkids is an affirmation of his new inclusive ethos. It may have still been recorded in his Donegal bedroom but appearances from Whipping Boy’s Fearghal McKee, Gaze Is Ghost offers contrast to Mannion’s own wobblyevoice on a playful and lo-fi-leaning album.


20.

Dublin experimental veterans’ sixth studio long-player takes them deeper,darker and longer. Written in 2015 as a single longform piece for a once-off performance in Dublin’s now-defunct Joinery venue, Tough Love is a diptych of 20 plus minute tracks of dense krautrock dystopian synth-dirge dramatics.


Pages: 1 2 3

Posted on December 12th, 2017

Tags:

Artists: , , , , , , ,

Ships‘ album Precession is one of the finest records of the year song-wise along with the most sonically detailed. It’s been on constant play since it came out earlier in the year and Sorca McGrath and Simon Cullen’s gigs have been regular features since.

For the Simon-featuring vocal cut ‘I Can Never’, the Dublin band teamed up with Irish illustrator Matt Griffin for a psychedelic retrostellar animated video.

Posted on September 28th, 2017

Tags:

Artists: ,

Here we go.

Two of my favourite Irish acts combine on this remix of Ships‘ ‘None Of It Real’, the most recent version of which featured on the Nialler9 highly-recommended debut album Precession.

Kildare duo Mix & Fairbanks have been knocking it out of the park of late on the remix front and last week Skream played their Orange Tree Edits release at Creamfields so the music is getting out there.

For this remix, M&F have added space and length to the original creating a space-disco odyssey with an acid dancefloor shade.

Catch both acts at Electric Picnic this weekend. Ships play Body & Soul main stage on Sunday (11pm) and Mix & Fairbanks play Casa Bacardi on Friday (4pm). EP Stage times.

Posted on August 29th, 2017

Artists: ,

RHA’s Hennessy Lost Fridays returns next Friday July 7th after its March edition sold out and they’re promising another night of “colour, creativity and cocktails.”

Lost Friday’s July edition will feature cutting edge and dynamic artists, musicians, and creatives including the creators of my Irish album of the year the disco-synth duo Ships, the upcoming experimental electronic artist Wastefellow and the Cork DJ Niamh Ní Shúilleabháin aka DJ Hula Hoops.

On the non-music front, also on offer is:

  • A walking tour of this summer’s RHA Annual Exhibition with Director Patrick T. Murphy.
  • Free, body or face art done by the Dublin Body Painting Jam.
  • Watch as an artist creates a 3D artwork using Google’s Tilt Brush and have the chance to step in and create your very own piece of art.
  • Artist Colm Mac Athlaoich will be doing free caricatures for people to take home and on the hour every hour he will be giving 15 minute mini-classes on how to draw caricatures

Throughout the night Hennessy’s expert mixologists will create bespoke Hennessy cocktails, as well as hosting cocktail masterclasses. Cocktails include Hennessy & Ginger and Hennessy Sidecar. Grub will be served up on our summer-eve patio.

Tickets €20 + booking fee (include two complimentary Hennessy cocktails)

Posted on June 29th, 2017

Tags:

Artists: ,

We’ve got the Body & Soul Festival stage times, the playlist and how here are the recommendation for 12 acts to see in Ballinlough this year featuring 9 acts & 3 DJs you must see.

Friday

1.

Anna Meredith

Friday, Main Stage, 10pm

I have zero idea what the live show from Scottish composer Anna Meredith will be like as she’s made music that had an epic brass quality and experimental post-rock-style music but if either of those show up as the sun sets on Ballinlough, particularly the bombastic ‘Nautilus’ then I’d be happy.


2.

Le Boom

Friday, Woodlands, 3am

A late-night show from one of the best new bands in Ireland? Nice. Christy Leech & Aimie Mallon are a party band who make music that moves between house, pop and electro. They are one of the hottest tickets on Irish festivals this summer so stay up late for this one.


3.

The Bug ft. Miss Red

Friday, Midnight Circus, 21:30

If it’s heavy bass and atmosphere with a gritty rhythmic shake informed by down and dirty Drum ‘n’ bass, ragga, grime, ambient and dub, then a live show from the Bug is a must.


DJs

Optimo

Friday, Midnight Circus, Midnight

JD TWitch and JG Wilkes would be an inspiration to myself and the Lumo Club crew, and no doubt countless others, because they are great DJs, they have eclectic taste, they aren’t afraid to throw a curveball in the mix , run a great label, have made great remixes and and they created the best Sunday club ever at Sub Club in Glasgow bar none. They curate and play the Midnight Circus on Friday.


Saturday

4.

Bonobo

Saturday 11:15pm, Main stage

Simon Greene’s most recent Bonobo album traded off his reputation as a creator of intricate electronica to add some toughness and dynamic dancefloor production to his music, making Migration his best work yet. Live, he’s already known for large band recreations of that music so this should be a treat.



5.

ELLLL (Live)

Saturday, Reckless In Love, 1am

Corkwoman Ellen King’s electronic is fairly uncompromising sonically, eschewing clean lines and grids for grit and lo-fi noise. Beneath it all, is a throbbing techno style. As seen in the recent Women In electronica documentary, King is also founder of the Gash Collective, who are also playing throughout the weekend.


6.

BARQ

Saturday, 1am Bulmers Lounge, Sunday Woodland stage 11:15pm

BARQ are seasoned musicians having played with Hozier, Kodaline, Monster Monster, Damien Dempsey, Loah, Lethal Dialect, Ryan Sheridan and Zaska in the past and are establishing their own rap-tinged soulful R&B jazz sound under a genre they’ve coined as “agrosoul.”


DJ

Sally Cinnamon

Saturday, Wonderlust, 11.15pm

Saturday is a great day for Irish DJs. While it would be remiss of me as one-third of Lumo CLub not to mention that we are playing twice on Saturday at Reckless in love from 4pm – 6pm and Absolut Bar late at 2am til close. So before you come over the latter, you can find my Loose Joints co-host Sally Cinnamon playing at the Wonderlust stage where I know there’s going to be be tunes I can recommend. Sally introduced me (and many others) to this track and it often gets a play in her sets.


Sunday

7.

Hundred Waters

Sunday, Main Stage, 9pm

Lisa lowres

One of my favourite live bands. The Florida band Hundred Waters‘ music features skittering electronic leaps, abstract folk textures and the undeniably beautiful voice of Nicole Miglis.


8.

Kelsey Lu

Sunday, Main Stage, 15:30 / Woodlands, 22:30

Kelsey Lu is a North Carolinian cellist and singer/songwriter who makes orchestrally-arranged ambient folk music and has an EP out on True Panther. She has earned comparisons to Alice Coltrane and Bat For Lashes, Lu’s music leans into the avant-garde spectrum yet she has collaborated with artists in the field of pop and R&B like Blood Orange, Kelela and Wet.


9.

Ships

Sunday, Woodlands 1am

They are the creators of an album that is one of my favourites of the year, an ’80s-inspired collection of strutting synth disco with heart. Simon Cullen and Sorca MCGrath will work better than most at 1am at a festival. The place to be.



DJs

Mix & Fairbanks

Sunday, Absolut Bar, 3pm


DJ Arveene has curated a whole weekend of DJs with an emphasis on the Irish selectors and the lineup is strong across the weekend with the likes of Ciara Brady, Kelly-Anne Byrne, Billy Scurry, Jimmy Rouge, Eddie Kay, Stevie G, Cyril Briscoe, DJ Deece and Aoife Nic Canna among them. Kildare up and comers Gary O’Reilly and Rob Smyth aka Mix & Fairbanks have recently got into original tracks to whopping effect, but it’s the skills as DJs playing disco and house edits and classics that started them on their path. Just listen to the Linndrum (80s drum machine) inspired mix they made for me last year.


Bonus

Sing Along Social

Sunday, Woodlands Stage. 6:45pm

Ok so slightly cheating here, but my wife Aoife runs Sing Along Social and last year’s Body&Soul was the first time her zero commitment choir debuted at a festival and it went off as you can see below. Basically, Sing Along Social is a zero-commitment choir, a group karaoke session, a party with lyrics and backing tracks. This year’s theme is Pop Battle so think Drake vs. Rihanna, Justin vs Britney, Abba vs. Fleetwood Mac and more, including props and inflatable. It’ll be gas. There’s a kids version on the Saturday too.

Posted on June 22nd, 2017

Tags:

Artists: , , , , , ,

Latitude Festival has grown to become one of the biggest in the UK with 15 stages and 750 acts on the schedule for the festival from 13th – 16th July in Henham Park, Suffolk.

The final acts were just added to the list including the BBC Music Introducing Stage and notable acts include Pumarosa, Skott and Beth Orton.

The Solas stage will host some familar Irish names to visitors of this site including Talos, TooFools, Rosie Carney, Ships, Le Boom, Ailbhe Reddy, Seamus Fogarty, David Keenan and Brian Deady.

Also playing that area are Dutch indie-pop Klangstof, the intense 4AD performer Aldous Harding, Swedish rising duo Geowulf, Danish band Lowly and singer-osngwriter John Smith.

Posted on June 19th, 2017

Tags:

Artists: , , ,